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Volume 1 Number 1
©The Author(s) 1999

New at ERIC/EECE

The Best of Parent News: A Sourcebook on Parenting from the National Parent Information Network, compiled by Anne S. Robertson. (December 1998; Catalog #221; ca. 170 pp.; $10.)

coverParent News, one of the services provided by the National Parent Information Network, is an Internet magazine that focuses on topics of interest to parents and professionals who work with parents. Many of the articles in Parent News have been developed around frequently asked questions from parents or to provide more information about issues raised on the PARENTING-L Internet discussion list. The Best of Parent News has been compiled in response to requests for a publication that would introduce those without Internet access to the activities and information available through the National Parent Information Network. This book provides an "offline" collection of education, parenting, child development, and family life information that will be of interest to parents and those who work with parents. Arranged in sections similar to those found in the Internet version of Parent News, The Best of Parent News includes "Feature Articles," "Community Spotlights," "Of Interest," and "ERIC Digests." As with the Internet version of Parent News, readers are encouraged to share the resources that they find useful with parenting groups, schools, and community development initiatives.

coverProceedings of the Families, Technology, and Education Conference, edited by Anne S. Robertson. (December 1998; Catalog #222; ca. 300 pp., $15.)

The Families, Technology, and Education (FTE) Conference was held in late 1997, when computer technology and the Internet were raising new issues and concerns as well as presenting new opportunities for parents in work, education, and family life. As the FTE Conference papers contained in this volume show, the thoughtful implementation of the new technologies can enhance parents’ access to information on, and provide assistance and support in, the task of parenting. Of interest to both parents and practitioners, papers in the volume cover applications of technology, concerns about equity of access to technology, use with gifted or differently abled children, opportunities and concerns presented by the Internet, and applications of new communications technology. Presenters include Linda Roberts, Barbara Bowman, the Blondin Family, Kenneth Komoski, Tony Wilhelm, and Jerold Bauch.

coverThe Project Approach Catalog 2, edited by Judy Harris Helm. (October 1998; Catalog #219; ca. 140 pp.; $10.)

This Catalog accompanied the Project Approach Study Group’s presentation at the 1998 annual meeting of the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) in Toronto, Canada. As in the first Project Approach Catalog, published in 1996, the project summaries in this 1998 issue indicate the range of locations, settings, age groups and mixes, and project topics with which the Study Group members have been working. A variety of issues of common concern to the group are addressed in the articles included in this Catalog. These include the phases of project work, project topic selection, the value of drawing in projects, introducing investigation skills with a mini-project, involving special needs children in projects, engaged learning and standards of work, and helping students at various levels of professional training to learn how to implement the Project Approach. Special sections on research and implementation of the Project Approach in Canada and on the Internet and the Project Approach are also featured.

coverRearview Mirror: Reflections on a Preschool Car Project, by Sallee Beneke. (November 1998; Catalog #220; ca. 80 pp.; ca. 90 photos and drawings; $10.)

This generously illustrated publication documents the work of a master preschool teacher, her co-teachers, student teachers, and very young children as they explored the automotive laboratory adjacent to their classroom at a community college in Illinois. The history of the project and the experiences it provided for the adults and the children in the preschool, as well as for the supervisors and students in the automotive laboratory, are described in sufficient detail to enable us to see the complexities of the events. We can appreciate how the master teacher confronts her own questions about helping student teachers learn the Project Approach, about when and how to guide the children, and about when to give help and when to withhold it. Ms. Beneke offers us the documentation of the children’s experiences in such a way that we can know not only what they did and what they learned, but we also can begin to understand what they felt. She shares with us her insights related to the potential pitfalls and benefits of project work to all the participating adults, as well as to the children.


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Early Childhood and Parenting Collaborative Information Technology Group (ECAP/ITG) PUBLICATIONS
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